Water4Islands Photo Contest Winner Announced

Nairobi, KenyaThe entries of Mahesh Kumar Aungnoo, from Mauritius, and from Carla Rebelo, from São Tomé and Príncipe, were selected as the 2 winning entries of the Water4Islands Photo Contest organised in 6 Small Islands States (Cabo Verde, Comoros, Maldives, Mauritius, Seychelles and Sao Tome and Principe) to celebrate World Water Day 2017. The two winners will be given the opportunity to attend the Stockholm World Water Week from 27 August to 01 September 2017.

Under the tagline “Water4Islands – What’s Your Water Story”, the theme of the competition was highlighting  the importance of water for Small Islands Developing States and the need to promote water use efficiency for instance in the form of wastewater reuse. In total, we received 156 entries illustrating a wide range of water issues in the 6 participating countries from rainwater harvesting promotion to potable water accessibility.

The two winning entries were selected for their originality, vibrant colours, technical quality and the great stories they were illustrating. You can see them below:

1.Mahesh Kumar Aungnoo, from Mauritius

You must be thinking: why is this tap upside down and how come water is just flowing out of it? Over here, people tend to put water pipes and taps everywhere without proper planning. In this picture, we can see a tap that has been wrongly installed. The tap was fixed vertically on the ground itself, at the corner of a garden, and the gardener forgot to close it. Because of how it is installed, it makes it easier for people to forget to switch it off, as it is not really visible to the eye. With this picture I want to show the importance of water and make people realise that by just placing a tap anywhere is not enough. We must be responsible, know the importance of water and find a suitable place where it can be accessible. Everyone should know how to avoid wastage, or else like just like this upside down tap, our lives will be upside down without water. You must be thinking: why is this tap upside down and how come water is just flowing out of it? Over here, people tend to put water pipes and taps everywhere without proper planning. In this picture, we can see a tap that has been wrongly installed. The tap was fixed vertically on the ground itself, at the corner of a garden, and the gardener forgot to close it. Because of how it is installed, it makes it easier for people to forget to switch it off, as it is not really visible to the eye. With this picture I want to show the importance of water and make people realise that by just placing a tap anywhere is not enough. We must be responsible, know the importance of water and find a suitable place where it can be accessible. Everyone should know how to avoid wastage, or else like just like this upside down tap, our lives will be upside down without water.

2. Carla Rebelo, from São Tomé and Príncipe

Vanessa is 3 years old and already helps her grandmother fetch water every afternoons. Having access to clean, potable water in her own home would give her a better chance to enjoy her childhood. Action needs to be taken now to rectify water issues across São Tomé and Príncipe, as well as the social consequences of not having access to water. Vanessa is 3 years old and already helps her grandmother fetch water every afternoons. Having access to clean, potable water in her own home would give her a better chance to enjoy her childhood. Action needs to be taken now to rectify water issues across São Tomé and Príncipe, as well as the social consequences of not having access to water.

Our regional jury was composed of:

1. Elisabeth Bernhardt, a Programme Officer at UN Environment working at the Ecosystems Division on Integrated Water Resources Management issues;

2. Nick Greenfield, Writer and Content Producer at UN Environment working in the Division of Communication on Global Environment Facility (GEF) projects implemented by the organisation;

3. Geraldine Deblon, Communication Officer for the IWRM AIO SIDS Project at UNOPS.

The members of the jury warmly congratulate the winners and all participants for their creative contributions to the competition and for helping raise awareness on water management issues and solutions in Small Islands Developing States.

This competition was organised under the framework of the Atlantic & Indian Ocean Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in Small Island Developing States (SIDS) project, financed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and jointly implemented by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and executed by the United Nations Office for Project Support (UNOPS).

Other:

See all entries to the photo competition on our Flickr page.